Can we really be Disability Confident?

I’ve recently come across this scheme which the government is promoting to make businesses more “Disability Confident”. On the fact of it, and in fact to a certain depth, this is enormously positive. The webpages are not a gimmick: they state in clear language the benefits to the employer of having good disability related policies to employ and retain disabled staff, supported by facts and figures. In particular they emphasise the frequency with which this actually means retaining skilled staff who become disabled during their working lives. This is a huge selling point for employers, for whom recruitment of skilled workers can be an enormous expense.

There are three levels to the Disability Confident scheme: an employer can be committed, Disability Confident, or a Disability Confident Leader. The documentation is clear on what should be done at each stage to achieve and maintain the label of Disability Confident. The principles set out, in that they make good sense to me as a disabled person, are frankly above and beyond what I have come to expect from British culture today! If this means what it has the potential to mean, that we might be moving forward as a country from the Autism Act 2009, through the Equality Act 2010, to progressively stronger guidance and legislation to protect and support disabled people, it would give me real hope for my future. The kind of hope I haven’t seen since beginning to pursue a diagnosis, almost two years ago.

There’s only one thing that worries me about this scheme, and that’s the phrase “self-assessment”.

In the level 1 documentation, on becoming “committed” to Disability Confidence, only once is it suggested that disabled people should be part of the assessment process: to test that the employer’s interview process is accessible. The second level, of actually being Disability Confident, adds the requirement to “[value] and [listen] to feedback from disabled staff”, including taking appropriate follow up action. Things like “making reasonable adjustments” and “promoting a culture … where your employees feel safe to disclose” are positive statements of actions that a business can take in making itself a safe and secure environment for disabled people. The level 2 documentation, if adhered to, describes an environment in which I personally would feel valued, confident, and encouraged to work hard towards achieving my full potential. It’s all there. But it’s not until level 3, a “Disability Confident Leader”, that the employer’s culture and environment is subjected to any serious assessment by actual disabled people.

There are plenty of people I know – otherwise hardworking and decent people – who are nonetheless thoughtless and occasionally discriminatory on the grounds of disability. It is difficult, when the lived experience of disability is so different, and particularly in a culture that infantalises and persists in speaking for and over this “lesser” group, to learn to appreciate the perspective of a disabled friend or colleague. It is hard for non-disabled people to realise the urgency of “reasonable adjustments”, or the stark reality that not only is there such a word as “can’t”, but there are people they work with who are forced up against that “can’t” every single day of their lives. Until you know that – until you have felt it, through thoughtful empathy or lived experience – it is impossible to appreciate how demoralising that can be.

So I wonder how much, through self-assessment alone, this Disability Confident scheme will be able to achieve towards improving the experience of disabled people in the workplace today?

For any employers out there considering the Disability Confident accreditation, as a disabled person fully committed to the wellbeing of my own organisation, I would highly commend it to you. But I would encourage you also to ask some hard questions of yourselves that are perhaps not stressed enough in the documentation. I would ask you to engage actively with disabled individuals and any disabled communities within your organisation. Ask them what they need to do their jobs well. Ask them how easy it is to get reasonable adjustments, and to be fully confident that agreed supports will be in place when they need them. Ask them anonymously, and be prepared to hear their honest answers.

Because the truth is that, even with the best will in the world, you may not yet be Disability Confident. And if you want to become so, you will need to ask yourselves hard questions about the past. When a deaf employee requested an external palentypist, and you had to refuse because some information was “commercial in confidence”, did you take the time to explore possible alternatives? When a dyslexic employee asked for notes to be taken in meetings, because he struggles to parse verbal instructions, did you tell him that was just too much of an admin overhead? Did you consider the impact on the disabled employee: which parts of their job would become more difficult or even impossible to do without these supports? In the future, what would you like to change?

Disability Confident is a hugely positive step in a culture that undervalues disabled people and the work they do. But self-assessment, where any organisation can blithely state that they are already Disability Confident, is not enough. To become safe and secure places where disabled people can work and thrive, many employers will have to recognise harsh truths around where their processes are not currently working. An essential part of the process of becoming Disability Confident is inviting honest input from disabled employees, accepting criticism with humility, and being willing to change.

In the future, I look forward with hope to the example set by Disability Confident Leaders, and their efforts to make the working world safe and accessible for us all.

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