Autumn is here

This time of year is usually difficult for me. Often SAD comes on gradually. Sometimes it’s sudden. Usually it’s both.

I noticed I was starting to get tired at the beginning of the month. I’d known it was coming; it didn’t seem so bad. Maybe the weather changed; maybe it was just more people around at work, back from their summer holidays, more admin and communications draining my resources just that tiny little bit more than usual. It’s always justifiable, always reasonable, in the beginning. Whatever it was, quite suddenly, the demands of every day left me flagging, unexpected struggling to navigate the familiar walk back home. So I rearranged my schedule, putting the chores back to the weekends, then concentrated on enjoying my evenings and got on with life as usual.

Now I’m sitting here and feeling tired, so dead tired, but not wanting to sleep. Now I’m planning the days ahead in the knowledge of not be able to function except on weekends, and maybe not even then. And suddenly nothing difficult can be done with less than two weeks notice. Life contracts to form a new, smaller normal.

It’s all of the little things, and the big. Things are stressful at work and I’m struggling to access support. I have a running injury; so the let-out for all of my everyday frustrations, that quiet time in the middle of the day to relax and recharge, is gone. I feel slow and tired, all the time. It’s hard to concentrate, to organise my tasks and focus on what I should do. I’m not sad. But I don’t want to do anything. I don’t want anything. Gradually, suddenly, autumn has crept up on me again.

Every year comes round again, every year the same; but different. Last year was different. This year is different. Last year I coped by reducing external pressures and focusing on things that made me happy. This year the pressure is unrelenting. But this year I have support from mental health services that I’ve never had before. This year I have an employment support coordinator to help me navigate my professional nightmares. This year I have a counsellor who knows I have a history, who won’t just drop me the instant I’m sub-clinical by GAD-7 or PHQ-9. This year, however isolated I might feel, crying at my desk at work, I’m not alone.

Maybe this time, things will be different.

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