Breathe

Time is contracting around me at the moment. To say I don’t know what prompted this would be a lie, but the suddenness and sheer intensity of the reaction never fail to catch me off guard. One moment I’m fine. The next I stall just trying to say the words: “I need to go home”.

Overload, stubbornly unremitting, has been the theme for this week. It started with a weekend all to myself, full of enthusiasm for clearing the inevitable backlog of mundane, everyday tasks. A whirlwind of activity, I almost succeeded. Then two nights I came home from work and I couldn’t stop. Sitting down quietly and clearing my head in time to sleep – just didn’t happen. So the next two days, in an office full of people? Crash and burn.

Experience tells me I need to try harder to slow down. A combination of really wanting to exploit the productivity (“aw, but I’m getting stuff done!”), along with something that lies partway between false confidence and wishful thinking (“I’ve learned to deal with this – it’ll be fine”), lead me time and again not to do what I know I need. It’s not easy to make that conscious decision to stop – stop making progress with this time and start to relax, right now. Because if you don’t, there will be no time tomorrow.

“No time” in this context seems like a strange way of putting it, particularly in a society where time is so fixedly absolute. Conventional wisdom – indeed, all reasonable logic – says that the more time I spend doing useful things tonight, the more time I will have tomorrow to spend as I please. But that is only true up to a certain point. Past that point, the more time I use today, the less is left over for tomorrow.

Like money, time in itself isn’t really important. What’s important is what it buys. Poverty and wealth aren’t defined by a simple threshold in annual income – however hard the media may try! The value of money is measured in the food it buys, the heating it pays for, and – when we are lucky – the opportunities it affords. In a suburb 50 miles from London, a 3 bedroom house can be bought for what it costs to rent a bedsit in the city. Money is relative. So is time.

My time isn’t measured in hours, minutes and seconds. It’s measured in fresh dinners cooked and casseroles bulk-frozen. It’s measured in shirts ironed. It’s measured in miles walked, cycled or driven to get to where I need to be. The units of time are activity. So for me, having “no time” literally means not being able to complete, between fixed commitments, the necessary activities to remain healthy and functional.

When I walk home overloaded, if I look up from the pavement, I will be lost. I know the route by heart, and must walk it as if in my sleep, because the conscious me does not know where I am. My mind overflows, making nonsense of the signs and signals around me. Just crossing the road is a dangerous adventure, and unreal – I could walk straight out into traffic that I hadn’t even seen. Bizarrely, these times when I run such concrete risks to my own physical safety are one of the very few times I do not feel fear. With such incredible volumes spilling over in my head, there is no abstract or spontaneous feeling. I feel everything that is real, from the visual and auditory and other sensory stimuli that I cannot at that moment process; and yet emotionally, I feel nothing.

When every step seems an age, and a half hour journey lasts a lifetime, the concept of time as an objective construct appears as it truly is: meaningless. When finally I arrive home, nothing will be done that night. In assembling dinner, I will sacrifice the next night – if I didn’t eat I might lose several more. On the third night, I will wake dimly from the haze with three nights worth of things to do. I will do two, in a panic, and cancel my weekend plans. Because although there was the same amount of time that week there always is, there wasn’t time.

Weeks are lost to these monstrous fluctuations, this constant uncertainty. Planning becomes impossible. Life becomes small, strung out and struggling. Isolation and focus become the only way to survive.

Of course, the flexibility of time has a flip side. The weekend hours are longer than those on weekday evenings. Freed of commitments, weekends can loosen the hours that have mercilessly constricted around my working days. Relaxing the schedule to drift between tasks, with no one to answer to, I can be safely and happily disoriented to focus on the important things at hand.

For now, another weekend has come. Precious time to spend reinflating the hours, so that next week, I can breathe.

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