(Un)medicated

Ele is currently having a mental health wobbly. Somewhere at the centre of this wobbly has been acknowledging and accepting that she can’t get through what she’s currently going through without medication.

I really struggle with attitudes to medication for mental health problems – including my own. The first time I told anyone I was on medication (last time, not this time) the reaction I got was of pure shock. I’ve encountered people who view medication as giving up; a sign of weakness; failure; lack of discipline or determination; and a shameful thing. Many others are determined to see medication as a crutch: a temporary support that mustn’t be used for too long, just until you can get back on your feet. I’ve been cautioned against the dangers of “becoming dependent”. Of all the people I know, only the few who have actually felt the benefits of medication in their own lives (and, thankfully, my GP) will view this choice in anything other than a negative way.

For the hardened shamers, there are many bloggers and artists who have confidently and eloquently explained the error of this viewpoint. One of my personal favourites is this comic, by Robot Hugs. If the skeptics don’t look at this and at least reconsider, they’re not worth my time.

The crutch argument, though, is something I find personally much more difficult. This is the one I agonise over. I suppose what it boils down to is the nature of the mental health problem. Just as with physical illness and injury, some things the body will repair in its own time, and some it won’t. You might be on crutches for a while with a broken ankle, before it heals and you learn to walk again. But if it’s a broken spine, you’ll be in a wheelchair for the rest of your life.

Regardless of the nature of my issues, the concept of medication as only a temporary support in itself is damaging to me. The problem is that if I see medication as a crutch, I am driven always to think forward to the time when I will be “mended” enough to set it aside. As soon as I reach that comfortable place of clearing my head of anxiety, or of thoughts that I don’t deserve to live, I’m immediately afraid and ashamed of relying on this medication that I now “don’t need”. Obviously, if I’m not actually suicidal, I can come straight off the antidepressants – right?

But what if I haven’t stopped needing that crutch? Just because I feel better when I’m taking medication, doesn’t automatically mean I’ll keep feeling better once I’m off it. Hopping along on crutches for that broken ankle, you might be absolutely pain-free, but you’ll know straight away if you drop them and try to put weight on it! I don’t know how much of this is me pushing myself too hard, or being too aggressively independent, but when a support is labelled as “temporary”, the anxiety of losing the crutch combined with the pressure to try and drag myself up without it is almost too much to bear.

Why is dependence on medication for mental illness seen as such a bad thing? We don’t shame diabetics for their insulin dependence. Is it because it’s something we can’t measure? There’s always the temptation to demand proof: proof that someone is really ill, that they really need those pills they take every day. It never seems to be considered why on earth we would take this stuff if we didn’t really need it! Medication is not an easy option. The paucity of knowledge around how the brain actually works makes medication for mental health issues less a precise science and more a matter of throwing different drugs at it until one of them does more good than harm. The side effects frankly suck. Why would anyone do this to themselves unless it were the best option left to them?

I’ve tried self-help and I’ve tried CBT. I’ve read all the popular wisdom on staying physically and mentally healthy. I kept a mood diary for a while and tried to identify triggers. Then I found out I was autistic and read an awful lot more.

But now I’m here. The local mental health services don’t want to deal with me because I’m on the spectrum. I’ve got as far as I can with CBT, and learning more about autism and all the things that are “wrong” about me (and how they could have been “fixed” if I’d been “treated” in childhood) is only adding to this hopeless fear. For me, right now, I know with complete certainty that medication is the right choice. I know I am absolutely right to stay on it for as long as I need, and to use that time to build up all the confidence and resilience I can. I just wish that knowing were the same as believing.

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