Dealing with change

Change is hard. It’s hard for everyone, to a degree. But for an autistic person, dealing with change and disruption to routine is on a whole other level. The sheer level of confusion and disorientation is indescribable (at least for today). The elephant panics. A lot.

The organisation I work for has been implementing some big changes recently. I knew they would be hard on me, so I made a plan. Let me be clear: I planned my whole life for the affected period around navigating this change. I did some batch cooking and filled the freezer with healthy food, so I wouldn’t have to cook in the evenings. I scheduled my work tasks (with the permission of my manager) around the disruption. I pulled out all the CBT techniques I learned last year for maximising personal resilience. It didn’t work.

The advice I would give anyone on the spectrum preparing to navigate big changes in their life – especially at work, and definitely if the change is the biggest you’ve ever had to deal with – is as follows:

  • First and foremost: look after yourself. No, seriously. Make a list of all the things you need to be physically and mentally healthy (food, exercise, quiet time, sleep, special interests if you have them, etc), and prioritise them in your schedule. Plan ahead with the basics as much as you need (I have coloured pens and everything!). And if you have friends who understand, let them know what’s coming. They might be able to help.
  • At work: don’t underestimate the impact. If you think it’s going to be bad, talk to your manager at an early stage (or another manager, if your own line manager is unsympathetic) to see what options might be available to you. It’s always better to manage expectations than to have to explain yourself after the event.
  • Be proactive in asserting your needs. As soon as you become aware of the change, figure out what you need and make sure the right people know about it. Even if you don’t know exactly what you need, try to identify the people who might need to know and pave the way in advance for those conversation to happen.
  • If there is any risk of meltdown at work, you need to make plans with your line manager (and/or a trusted colleague) for what should happen if things get out of hand. I have anxiety issues, as well as an apparently chronic inability to look out for my own needs, that have brought me to the brink of meltdown in the workplace on multiple occasions. Tell your manager what you need them to do to diffuse the situation. Make sure the plan has space for them to enforce any consequences for unacceptable behaviour, but make it clear that they need to wait for you to calm down and recover before this will have any effect.
  • And finally: always know where your safe space is. You never know when you might need it!

Good luck!

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